Research + Analysis

Research + Analysis

Expertise in harnessing, interpreting, and leveraging legal knowledge and data to create a competitive edge that solves real-world problems and satisfies stakeholders.

Research + Analysis

Legislative research in the age of social media

This is a spin-off from our previous panel on Social Media as Primary Sources of Government Information. Law librarians are tasked with finding sources of legislative intent when it comes to bills and laws. With Congress and government agencies using social media as their primary and sole method of communication, how do law librarians account for the access and preservation of this valuable data? Potential speakers include: ...more »

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79 votes
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(@sgualtier)

Research + Analysis

How Codes are Made: Creating Laws in Civil Jurisdictions

Is there a difference between a code and a set of statutes? How does the process of codification differ between common law and civilian jurisdictions? What roles do legislatures and law reform bodies play? This panel will help librarians to understand the role that codes play in civilian and mixed jurisdictions and how and whether it differs from that of the "codes" that most of us would recognize as codified statutes. ...more »

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64 votes
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(@sarah)

Research + Analysis

Obtaining & Using Copyrighted Materials from Foreign Countries

What does a U.S. law librarian do when a book or report that a patron needs to consult is only available at a library in England or India? How about when a thesis or document that another patron needs for research purposes is only available at a library in Namibia or New Zealand? Many libraries do not want to lend items internationally through OCLC WorldShare Interlibrary Loan, so ILL requests sent to non-U.S. countries ...more »

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57 votes
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(@mwpodvia)

Research + Analysis

Voodoo and the Law

Voodoo is a polytheistic religion that is derived from African cult worship and that borrowed elements from Roman Catholic worship. Voodoo was brought to Louisiana from Haiti and other Caribbean islands. This program will examine Voodoo and discuss legal issues involving Voodoo that have arisen over the years. It is hoped that Bloody Mary, the current Voodoo Queen of New Orleans, will be among the speakers.

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60 votes
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(@sgualtier)

Research + Analysis

Through the Codes Darkly: Slave Law and Civil Law in Louisiana

In his 2012 book, "Through the Codes Darkly: Slave Law and Civil Law in Louisiana" (https://www.lawbookexchange.com/pages/books/59912/vernon-valentine-palmer/through-the-codes-darkly-slave-law-and-civil-law-in-louisiana), Tulane Law Professor Vernon Palmer challenged the prevailing argument that Louisiana's slave laws were more permissive or protective than those of the other states. The differences between Louisiana's ...more »

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53 votes
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Research + Analysis

Legal information from U.S. Territories: What a conundrum!

Legal information from and on the current U.S. territories is a nightmare to find. Most major commercial vendors do not include this information and local institutions do not have the resources to digitize and make this information more accessible. What should we do? Potential speakers include law librarians from different U.S. territories, law librarian specializing in this area, perhaps a government/court librarian ...more »

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55 votes
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Research + Analysis

Making Google Scholar work for your institution

Google Scholar aggregates scholarly works, uses library links to make searches easier and quicker, widens exposure of scholarly output, generates metrics, and auto-populates new works. Concerns about its use and impact abound from overpopulation of scholarly works from scam publications to Google's ruthless shuttering of services (Reader, URL shortener, Plus, EU News, Fit, Hangouts). With Universities adopting/contracting ...more »

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49 votes
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Research + Analysis

French, Spanish, African and Jewish influences in US Law

New Orleans and Louisiana in general with its rich city and legal history is the perfect set for this panel. Legal experts and historical experts will shed some light on the French, Spanish, African and Jewish influences which might have been present and even created in Louisiana or New Orleans and then made it to US law. This panel is sponsored by the Jewish Law Librarians Caucus and the FCIL-SIS. Potential speakers ...more »

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49 votes
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(@sgualtier)

Research + Analysis

Is it Napoleonic? Foreign/Domestic Influences on LA Civil Code

Interpreting and researching modern civil law depends upon an understanding of the historical sources from which those laws evolved. People often say that Louisiana uses the Napoleonic Code, but is that true? Louisiana has been both a French and Spanish colony, and it has been a part of the American legal system for over 200 years; it has also been influenced by Roman Law, Greek Law, Canon Law, and the Germanic Civil ...more »

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45 votes
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(@lstreet)

Research + Analysis

After UELMA: Accessing and Protecting Free, Official Law Online

Now that UELMA has been adopted in a number of states, the law library community must consider what to do to protect and preserve free, official versions of law online. UELMA was designed to sidestep conflict over copyright of law and other issues with how states present official versions of the law online. However, with cases involving copyright of official legal texts, (State of Georgia v. Public.Resource.Org), and ...more »

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45 votes
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Research + Analysis

Legal research in civil law jurisdictions - all that different?

Legal research in civil law jurisdictions may not be as different as you may expect! The influence of the common law can be seen, for instance, in the increased reliance on precedent and increased length in decisions. One might even question whether the emphasis on doctrine is really as strong now as it used to be. A slight spin on the ideas already suggested, this panel is a little more introductory, but acknowledges ...more »

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41 votes
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Research + Analysis

Jim Crow in NOLA: Segregated libraries, schools and law schools

As recent as last year, the ALA apologized for its silence on segregated libraries in the 1960s: https://bplolinenews.blogspot.com/2018/06/ala-apologizes-for-silence-on.html This declaration came after Shirley and Wayne Wiegand's book about library segregation in the South: https://www.proquest.com/blog/pqblog/2018/The-Hidden-History-of-Segregation-in-Libraries.html Given the fact that these public libraries also served ...more »

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38 votes
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