Teaching + Training

Teaching + Training

Developing, delivering, and assessing learning opportunities that prepare students, lawyers, and others for workplace excellence.

Teaching + Training

Submitted by (@eschille)

Teaching Technology and Information Ethics

Questions about what constitutes ethical technology and information use are among the most pressing challenges facing the legal profession, yet existing standards for professional conduct often fail to adequately address lawyers’ need for guidance in the contemporary information landscape. This program will address how librarians' expertise in information seeking behavior, research tools and methods, and applied technology ...more »

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58 votes
60 up votes
2 down votes
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Teaching + Training

Submitted by (@alyson.drake)

Strategic Partnerships to Create Experiential Research Classes

Developing specialized experiential research courses are a great way to help your law school meet its experiential credits requirements. To create a successful simulation course in a topical area (IP law, international law, etc.), you must know the types of research most likely to be performed by your graduates. Academic librarians should have an ongoing conversation with firm and government libraries to know what kinds ...more »

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51 votes
54 up votes
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Teaching + Training

Submitted by (@armoye7)

Creating Subject Specific Advanced Legal Research Classes

Many academic law librarians are interested in teaching legal research, but first-year courses and advanced legal research may already be provided at their school. When our law school floated the idea of offering a one-week "mini-semester" our librarians saw this as an opportunity to create some targeted, research specific courses. Four of our public services librarians took on a subject area of interest to them (Legal ...more »

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49 votes
52 up votes
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Teaching + Training

Submitted by (@tarynrucinski)

Prepare to Practice: Judiciary Style

Working for a federal or state court can be one of the most prestigious jobs that a recent law school graduate can obtain. However, in our obsession with preparing students for practice the one area that is often overlooked is the type of research skills that new law clerks and judicial interns need in order to succeed. Please join us in a panel discussion featuring federal and state judicial librarians to get the inside ...more »

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48 votes
51 up votes
3 down votes
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Teaching + Training

Submitted by (@ram6023)

Legal Research Competency: Bridging the Gap.

What do law firm, court and government law librarians want our students to come prepared to do? What are academic librarians teaching and how can we better prepare our students for practice? Dive into the Principles & Standards for Legal Research Competency to assess our own teaching and assessment of student research competency to help bridge the gap between law school and practice.

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46 votes
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Teaching + Training

Submitted by (@kbrice)

Legal Technology Competence Certifications

More than 30 jurisdictions have adopted the ABA's infamous Comment 8 to Rule 1.1 regarding technology knowledge and skill in regards to competence. How can law schools and law firms be sure that their legal professionals are competent in this area? Is certification worth it? This program would explore legal technology competence certification, including solutions available, implementation, costs, and the potential ...more »

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43 votes
46 up votes
3 down votes
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Teaching + Training

Submitted by (@johnpmayer)

Law Librarians as Access to Justice Heroes

The "Access to Justice Gap" is massive. 50% of people eligible for legal aid cannot get it because there are not enough legal aid lawyers. In some courts, 90% of the plaintiffs are self-represented. One of the most common places that people find legal information is at their local public, court or county library. Librarians have traditionally provided guidance, forms, packets and other assistance. There are brand ...more »

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43 votes
46 up votes
3 down votes
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Teaching + Training

Submitted by (@alyson.drake)

Cognitive Theory 101

With librarians in all settings teaching more and more often, it's important that we have at least a baseline understanding of some of the basic concepts of cognitive theory and educational psychology. This program would introduce attendees to a handful of concepts related to these fields and give examples of how to design their instructional programming with these theories in mind.

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40 votes
41 up votes
1 down votes
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Teaching + Training

Submitted by (@lturner)

FCIL Reference Toolkit

Many of the standard reference tools used for FCIL reference questions have become outdated. What is the FCIL reference toolkit for the modern reference librarian? This program would gather FCIL specialists who would discuss and demonstrate the best FCIL reference sources. The audience for this program would be reference librarians of all types.

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37 votes
41 up votes
4 down votes
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Teaching + Training

Submitted by (@alyson.drake)

Cultural Competency Training in FCIL Research Courses & Beyond

FCIL research courses/trainings are a great way to help teach cultural competency to students. Students learn about other legal systems and values and engage in exercises that make them consider their own biases; program could give examples of exercises/assignments that students can engage in to grapple with these issues. A program on cultural competency could also expand to working with patrons/clients/attorneys from ...more »

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35 votes
36 up votes
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Teaching + Training

Submitted by (@maricheney18)

Change Your Syllabus, Change Your Life

Professor Elizabeth Sherowski will discuss making the move from a rule-focused syllabus to a learner-focused syllabus, providing examples from the evolution of her own syllabi, and giving attendees the opportunity to workshop their own. By the end of the session, attendees will understand how and why the learner-focused syllabus is better for both students and their professors.

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35 votes
37 up votes
2 down votes
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